Kung Fu vs. Qigong: A Quick Visual Explanation

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Sometimes, emails arrive in my inbox with questions that beg to be answered with a video.

A few weeks ago, a sincere young man named Nick sent this question.

“I read online that qigong is a style of kung fu. Is it true? I’m confused.”

Well Nick, the internet can be a pretty confusing place! With so much information at your fingertips, it’s hard to separate the true from the false.

Normally, I would write a blog post to answer Nick’s question. But this time, I decided that a video would work better.

Videos are a fantastic teaching tool because they give me the ability to demonstrate my answers. I can also pronounce confusing Chinese terms.

I shot this quick video in the Ozark mountains after giving an advanced qigong workshop to a wonderful group of students at the Stone Wind Retreat.

If you’re still confused about how kung fu relates to qigong, then the video below will help.

Here are some of the topics covered:

  • The real meaning of kung fu
  • How Tai Chi Chuan fits in…
  • The confusion with wushu…
  • Various styles of kung fu:
    • The Shaolin Five Animals…
    • Wing Chun Kung Fu…
    • Tai Chi Chuan…
  • The dividing line between qigong and kung fu…
  • The flowing characteristics of Tai Chi Chuan…
  • Cursive writing vs. block writing in kung fu…
  • Is Lifting The Sky a form of kung fu?
  • Can you fight with Golden Bridge Qigong?
  • One Finger Zen Qigong
  • Shooting Arrows Qigong
  • Martial vs. Non-martial Qigong.

Watch the video for free here:

I’ve written on this topic before. If you’d like to read more, here are 4 good places to start:

  1. The Difference Between Tai Chi, Qi Gong, and Chai Tea
  2. How Tai Chi Lost Its Mojo
  3. The Difference Between Kung Fu, Gung Fu, and Gung Ho.
  4. The History of Qigong and Tai Chi: Facts And Myths

Do you enjoy video blogs like this? If so, let me know in the comments below.

Normally, I prefer to use the written word along with images, but videos can be super helpful. I hope that you found this video helpful. If you’d like me to shoot more like this, then make sure to let me know! 

Mindfully yours,
Sifu Anthony

I’m Anthony Korahais, and I used qigong to heal from clinical depression, low back pain, anxiety, and chronic fatigue. I’ve already taught thousands of people from all over the world to use qigong for their own stubborn health issues. I teach online courses, and also lead in-person retreats and workshops.

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25 Responses to Kung Fu vs. Qigong: A Quick Visual Explanation

  1. Eric November 16, 2016 at 3:35 am #

    LOVED the idea of a video. I find them all super useful as you always include a heap of information, and your method of speaking/teaching is very engaging.

    Also, each one has its own individual nuances so it’s handy to watch/review all of them regularly as you can expect to learn, or rehash, something each time you watch them.

    Keep up the great job, Sifu!

  2. prayingmano1 November 16, 2016 at 8:46 am #

    I truly loved the videos as well as all the writings and videos!!! Very informational and i learn a lot and im able to apply them to my practice.
    Thank you for sharing your passion!!
    Please keep it up!!! 🙂

  3. Suyog Shrestha November 16, 2016 at 9:05 am #

    very informative video and posts.

  4. Beverley Kane, MD November 16, 2016 at 12:10 pm #

    Great video! Thank you.

  5. vimala nayar November 16, 2016 at 12:56 pm #

    Thank you Sifu Anthony for the interesting video.

  6. Tim November 16, 2016 at 1:18 pm #

    Great video! Could you explain the differences between the different schools of Tai Chi Chuan?

    Thanks!

  7. MARIA GUADALUPE CARDOSO SANTANA November 16, 2016 at 1:27 pm #

    SI CLARO ¡ UN VIDEO ES MUY ÚTIL RECURSO PARA EXPLICARNOS GRACIAS POR SU VALIOSO TIEMPO PARA COMPARTIR BUENA INFORMACIÓN

  8. David Barnett November 16, 2016 at 8:27 pm #

    I loved the analogy of block vs cursive writing. Brilliant!

  9. Mike stapler November 17, 2016 at 11:38 am #

    This was very informative and a great way to present the material. We’re all familiar with the adage that a picture is worth a 1000 words; by extension, then, a “moving picture” would be worth considerably more.

    Thanks, Sifu Anthony.

    Mike Stapler

  10. Dion Short November 17, 2016 at 6:44 pm #

    Thoroughly enjoyed the video–the humor, too. Also, your liking of karate and kung fu to block writing and tai chi to cursive writing was absolutely ingenious!. Great video.

  11. Ken Long November 17, 2016 at 7:45 pm #

    Great video. I like your style and what you know and teach.
    I’m interested in learning the health and dance and energy manipulation of Tai Chi. Rather than the striking.
    I have no interest in fist fighting, or attacking someone. I prefer the neutralization techniques displayed in Aikido, with the dance and flow of Tai Chi. I dont know what to call this but I’m searching.

    • Sifu Anthony Korahais November 17, 2016 at 8:18 pm #

      Thanks Ken. It sounds like you would be interested in tai chi pushing hands. It’s the original art of neutralization! And there’s no striking allowed.

  12. Dariusz Gwizdowski November 18, 2016 at 5:31 pm #

    Hi Sifu.
    I really enjoyed the video. Thank You for explaining it really nicely and clearly.
    I knew that Tai Chi is a martial art – my Tai Chi teacher says when we practice how You use certain moves in fight ( which is a block and which a hit). Most of the Qigong i ever did is for health purposes. As You said in the video there are Qigong forms You may use in fight but it is not so often meet as in Tai Chi.
    Thank You for the video :}

  13. Lynn McClary November 21, 2016 at 7:50 pm #

    I loved the video; it reminded me of how great you made me feel in the studio.

  14. Doc sexton December 19, 2016 at 9:23 am #

    Id like to learn more do you have a mailing list I can get on? My email is [email deleted for digital security]. Your articles and videos are most useful and informative!

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